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Persepolis, by Marjane Satrapi

(Image credit: http://www.powells.com)

(Image credit: http://www.powells.com)

Satrapi, Marjane. Persepolis. New York, NY: Pantheon Books, 2003. Print.

Annotation: Iranian history and stories of the religious and political revolutions of the 1980s are told through the eyes of young Marji in this graphic novel.

Booktalk: Marji tried to be aware of her heritage, her history, and her surroundings. She watched the news, and she read history and philosophy books, even when she was just 10 years old. Then she had to come to the realization that many of the things she had been told, especially by the media, were completely false, and that maybe the emotional truths of her history and philosophy books should be called into question.

Marji lived in Iran in the 1980s, when political and religious revolutions pummeled the citizens from every side. Her French school closed down, and she had to go to a Muslim school; she was forced to wear a veil, and to observe religious practices that were not her own. The attempts made to keep the people of her country submissive and similar to one another could do nothing to flatten Marji’s personality—Nikes and Michael Jackson were not just for Americans in the 80s, much to the chagrin of the Iranian rulers—but they could do much harm to those in need of medical care outside of the country, to those who lost their homes to wartime bombs, and to those imprisoned for their beliefs or ideals.

How did it all happen? What was Marji’s family history that made it all so personal, and how did it end for her? Maybe I should let Marji tell you.

Awards:

Time Magazine Best Comix of the Year

New York Times Notable Book

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